THE SOVIET INVASION OF POLAND DURING WORLD WAR TWO

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Following WW2, Anna and Bronislaw took independant paths to Canada 

Bronislaw came to Canada aboard the Aquitania, arriving in Halifax and continuing on to Temiscaming, Quebec where he met up with his father Wojciech (George) whom he had not seen since 1926.
 
All those years since 1926 George had been working in the pulp and paper mill, sending money home to Poland to improve the lot of his family. Now Bronek too began work at the mill, in the "blow pits," joining the International Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, local 233.
 
After almost 5 years at the mill, in the spring of 1953, the entire family moved to Toronto where Bronek become heavily involved in the Polish community.

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INVITATION TO A DANCE: PROCEEDS TO THE POLISH SCOUTS

Wedding of Anna Usowicz and Bronislaw Sokolowski
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Montreal 1956

Wojciech Sokolowski
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Late 1950s

After the war, the gentlemen pictured below (and many others like them in the Polish emigre community around the world) worked tirelessly on behalf of the Polish Government-in-Exile in London, England.
 
For many Polish exiles, World War Two had not yet ended as long as their homeland was occupied by the Soviets. In fact, although demobilized by the British government in England, the soldiers of the Polish Forces in the West were not demobilized by the Polish Government-in-Exile. Many Polish soldiers, within their veterans' organizations, maintained a combat readiness well into the 1950s.
 
This is not as unreasonable as it may sound. Following the post-war Soviet takeover of much of Eastern Europe and the dropping of the Iron Curtain, Soviet intentions became painfully clear to the Western leaders, who had never believed the Poles, and the Cold War began. There was for many years an impending sense that a third world war was looming just around the corner.
 
Standing from the left: A. Bluj, J. Kwaczek, J. Moscicki, C. Kobylanski, M. Poprawa, R. Rodycz, M. Lottamoza
 
Sitting from the left: B. Kowalski, S. Rzepka, K. Pygiel, Minister O. Jastrzembski, T. Rosol, F. Drabczyk, S. Rajca, B. Sokolowski
 
Here, these men have just been decorated for their service to Poland by Minister Oktawian Jastrzembski of Montreal. Despite the fact that England no longer recognized the exiled Polish government, they allowed it to exist. The Government-in-Exile finally blended with the de facto Polish government after communist rule dissolved in 1989.  

Toronto, May 17, 1958
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Recipients of the Krzyz Zaslugi

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Invitation to a dance: fundraiser for "Help for Poland"

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The Committee for the "Help For Poland" Organization

Fundraiser entitled "Some Comedy, Some Song"
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Event for the AK (Armia Krajowa) or Home Army: proceeds to help the war invalids in Germany

Bronek retired in 1975 at the age of 65 and spent his remaining years quietly enjoying life.